Category Archives: Dave’s Blog

My Friend – Nostalgic Folk Pop Royalty Free Production Music

This week, we’re featuring the Production Music track My Friend, ID 378834, a nostalgic folk pop cut that is great for peaceful, reflective moments in any type of multimedia project (such as the stock footage clips we paired it up with). This piece of royalty free music isn’t your typical stock music track: it’s packed with emotion and pensive thought, with gentle acoustic guitar strumming and interspersed piano melodies moving the piece forward while reflecting on all that is and was.

For demonstration purposes, we’ve combined this track with some amazing nature stock footage: clips 350535 (a large tree branch dripping from rain) and 350306 (a stately tree with autumn-colored leaves gently flowing in a fall breeze). The clips are peaceful and reflective, and show off the emotional nature of this week’s royalty free music pick.

Scary and Mysterious Stock Music Pick of the Week

With Halloween right around the corner, we put together a spooky little pick of the week featuring a royalty free stock music theme by Premium Trax combined with some haunting stock footage of a mountain sunrise along with a stock photo of a pile of skulls with some fancy vintage effects. We figure all that’s left is a few horror sound effects from the Productiontrax library, and you’ve got yourself a nice piece of media to scare the neighborhood children.

Scary and Mysterious Theme features deep and dark orchestral strings, an almost-cliché bell-like synth sound, big drum hits and scary sound effects. It dark, mysterious character makes it perfect for dramatic suspense movies and videos. We combined this track with stock footage clip 372369, an otherwise harmless video of a mountain sunrise, and immediately felt something sinister brewing. We recommend pairing the track with other clips of fog and shadows to achieve a similar fee.

For the stock photo, we chose a photo that’s disturbing on its own — photo ID 325152: a pile of skulls. We affected it with some aged film effects, and it added that horror picture feel right in. The beauty of this track is in its ability to creepify even the most mundane of images. We recomend taking some shots of a city street at night and affecting it the same way. You’ll see what we mean.

Royalty Free Music Pick of the Week – The Next Big Thing

This week’s royalty free music pick of the week is a stellar production music track by Michael Musco called The Next Big Thing. Featuring a light, bouncy, percussive riff and simple piano, the track adds a hip beat and begins to soar. This track is one minute in length, making it perfect for advertising, themes, and promotional videos, particularly in tech and healthcare. Trust us, it’s very 2.0.

We’ve paired this stock music track with three corporate themed stock footage clips to give you a better sense of how this track might be used in a business project. Check out the video below, and license the track and the footage for your next production.

Music ID: 348921
Footage Clips: 362175, 362211, 362227

Six Great Uses for Stock Footage

Most people know that using royalty free music can save them a lot of time and money in production. Similarly, stock footage is a great time saver, allowing producers of multimedia content to deliver their final projects on budget and on time, without sacrificing creativity and visual diversity. Here are a few ways you can use stock footage to your advantage:

1) Background projection at concerts and live events. Music and visual stimulation go hand in hand, and stock footage creates awesome background animations for large-scale projection needs. Whether it’s a small club or giant rock venue, your graphics team can enhance any production with the use of royalty free video. Think timelapse clouds, bustling urban scenes, or psychadelic sequences to accompany your next performance or speech. Stock footage allows you to create amazing live performances with moving images at a fraction of the cost of hiring out a full production crew.

stock footage
Set a futuristic sci-fi scene with a single, low cost stock footage clip.

2) Establishing location. For films and television shows requiring shots that set location, stock footage clips can go a long way in helping you to tell the where of your story. For example, inserting a stock video clip of a city highrise just before a scene can help your audience visualize that the scene takes place in a downtown office. Stock footage allows for a lot of creativity along these lines, easily affording aerial shots of cities, mountain ranges, and futuristic planetary locations. The only limit to where your next film can take place is your imagination.

3) Montages. Timelapse stock footage comes in really handy for creating montages and similar visual sequences. The fact that the video has already been edited together for you is also a huge timesaver. We like to combine montages with some royalty free music for really effective promo videos with inspiring messages.

4) Source footage for props. With a little bit of graphic artistry, you can take any clip and put it on a TV screen, computer screen, or anything else you can imagine. When a prop requires moving images, you can get a lot of utility out of simple stock footage clips.

5) Video to accompany podcasts. When you’re producing a daily or weekly audio podcast, you don’t always have time to find great images to accompany your audio. You can easily take an audio-only podcast to the realm of video podcasting with some stock footage clips. With some simple video editing software, you can mix your podcast audio with clips covering just about any topic.

News broadcasts. Have a breaking story to cover? We all know that being first with a story is everything in the news industry, and stock footage clips allow you to break the news visually faster than any other method of production, short of standing on the scene live. Inserting cool animations, historical shots, and other royalty free clips can help provide visual variety to your watchers with minimal investment of time and money.

How are you using stock footage?