Tag Archives: entertainment

How Royalty Free Music Can Boost Your Video Marketing ROI

If your creative agency like most businesses, you know that getting the most bang for your buck from your marketing dollars is crucial to success. If you use needledrop or custom production music in any of your marketing, making the switch to royalty free music in your marketing activities, whether on social media or at live events, can save you thousands of dollars per project, making switching to stock music an effective strategy for increasing your bottom line.
royalty free music for video marketing
If you market using video on social media sites, creating videos for YouTube or other video agregators is key to your success. However, professional production can cost tens of thousands of dollars, from actors to equipment, to full out production companies, editors, script writers, and more. Adding to this expense is custom music, which can run you anywhere from several hundred to several thousands for a couple minutes of music, especially if you’re looking for exclusivity. In fact, many production houses build in music licensing fees anywhere from $5000 to $20,000 depending on the project’s overall budget. All this for an online video?

You can trim the fat, thereby increasing your video’s overall effectiveness and increasing your ROI by switching to inexpensive royalty free music. Sure, it’s not exclusive, and sure, you’re not going to have Miley Cyrus’s latest twerk. However, finding something similar sounding by a professional musician in a royalty free music library will save you tens of thousands in licensing fees. If you can avoid needledrop libraries, where they charge you a fee per use, you can even make your project even more cost-effective. At productiontrax.com, you can get a professionally produced pop soundtrack for your next YouTube video for less than $50, with no needledrop fees, and no royalties to pay.

By cutting out unnecessary licensing costs, you can remove bloat from your project’s overall cost. If you could lower your marketing spend by $5000, and still get comparable results, it seems like a no-brainuh. Let’s face it, it’s the internet. No one is going to care (or even remember) that you got the exclusive rights to Twerkatwerk, 2013’s top pop smash, for your viral video. Royalty free music is a perfect substitute: it’s plenty cheaper, and sounds just as good.

Stock Music for Befuddled Bee

Using a combination of ToonBoom Studio 6, Audacity, iMovie,and GarageBand, Yootoon Studios created a fun animated short about a bee who has a moment of uncertainty as he steps out of his hive. To add to the fun and to create a matching soundtrack to highlight the story and give life to their animated character, the folks at Yootoon Studios utilized a stock music track from Productiontrax.com and incorporated it into the one-minute film’s soundtrack.

Baxter Bee – Befuddled Bee uses a piece called The Cue, with music composed, arranged & produced by Thomas Bukket, licensed for commercial use – track ID 5143. It’s a jolly, light-hearted, dixieland piece that is perfect for children’s projects and animated shorts like this one.

Yootoon Studios is cartoon creator Butch Hartman’s new animation channel, with new episodes on YouTube every Wednesday at 12PM. You can even submit your own stuff.

5 Tips for Promoting Your Music with Social Media

Social media has become the standard for promoting your music online. According to Alex Pham of the LA Times, “musicians who don’t take advantage of social networking tools will soon perish in the La Brea tar pits of old-school media.”

According to Pham, and a panel of social media rock-star experts, the five following tips can help you maximize your usage of social networks, and take your next album from bronze to platinum.

1. Be real. “It can’t just be about commerce. People want to connect with you and get to know you. They don’t want to connect with you if you’re just telling them to go buy your record. They don’t want you to be perfect, either. They want you to be real.” — Evan Greene, chief marketing officer, the Recording Academy

2. Pick a couple of services you like and focus on them. “There are so many services out there that trying to do everything and be everywhere is impossible. Play around with them. It’s okay to mess up. And don’t have a PR person handle your tweets. It should be all about having a real conversation with your fans.” — Kevin Rose, founder, Digg

3. Have something unique. “There’s so much already out there, and people have so little time that having something unique about yourself and your music can give you a competitive advantage. Figure out what’s unique about you and ask: What is the distilled message? It has to be something so remarkable that other people will have to share it.” — Pete Cashmore, founder, Mashable

4. Share things that you are most excited about. “Share things you find, love, hate and create. Share the things you’ve made, even if it’s not finished yet. That’s what makes it engaging.” — David Karp, founder, Tumblr

5. Embrace anarchy. “We had an event called the summit. A thousand people would participate and become part of the recording process. I got a Twitter message from someone in Iran who was frustrated they couldn’t come. We came up with a program that allowed them to sit at home and participate. It’s a world of chaos at times. But there are lessons. It’s a fertile ground for creativity.” — Jared Leto, vocalist, guitarist and songwriter for the band 30 Seconds to Mars

Do you do these already? What else do you do to stay in touch with your fans and your customers?

Copyright Law – Are Artists Asking For More Than Their Fair Share?

This from TechDirt:

The main backers of the online video site Hulu, NBC Universal and News Corp., are two of the stronger supporters of our copyright system, and have, at times, been known to push to make it even more stringent in order to “protect” their works. So, it’s interesting to see them discovering that draconian copyright rules can come back and bite them as well. We were just covering some of the problems various TV shows have had being put on DVD due to licensing problems, and now it appears those same problems are making it difficult to get some shows up on Hulu — despite the fact producers would like those shows online.

One of our readers, named Mark, wrote in to let us know that he and his wife had been watching the old TV show The Pretender on Hulu, when they realized that some of the episodes were simply missing (including the entire final season). He wrote to Hulu to ask why, and was told:

“Thank for letting us know that some episodes from The Pretender appear to be missing from our lineup. Individual episodes are sometimes held up due to rights issues, quite often related to music used in the show – and that’s the case this time – some of the music in episodes 17 and 18 couldn’t be cleared for online streaming. We’ll continue to request them from our content partner, but at this time we can’t offer them though we’d love to.”

It’s still difficult to understand why we would ever design copyright law and licensing policy in this manner. After all, having certain songs included in a TV show is never going to hurt the commercial viability of a song.

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The question being asked by many non-musicians and non-artists consumers (mostly who just want to buy the complete season of CSI on DVD) is this: are musicians and composers asking too much to be paid each time their song is aired in a TV show? If a piece of clothing is sold, for example Ben buys a shirt, the clothing designer only get paid once, even though the shirt may be worn hundreds of times by Ben. So why should a song in a TV show generate a royalty for each broadcast and subsequent DVD of the same show? Should composers be paid once, up front, for the usage, and then let that be it? What about when the TV show get’s put on DVD? Is it the same product still? Are artists and copyright law correct in demanding additional compensation? Do the laws need to be changed?

I, for one, am a proponent of intellectual property rights. A copyright owner should be able to sell and license a work as he or she sees fit. If a consumer cannot afford the cost of one artist’s work, move on to the next offer, or write your own song. An artist should be compensated for the time and expertise it took to create such a high-demand piece of art. If TV networks are unwilling to pay the cost of licensing, they have the ability to move to the next option on the affordability chain. It’s their responsibility to balance cost against the demand of their audience.