Tag Archives: marketing

Using Stock Music at Trade Shows to Create a Multisensory Experience

Enhance your trade show presence with stock music for a display people will remember.
If you or your marketing team are regular exhibitors at trade shows, you know the value of standing out from the crowd. Stock music, when used correctly, can enhance your company’s marketing efforts at industry shows and events, increasing the ROI of your marketing spend.

stock music for trade shows
Key Stats
With the typical trade show boasting on average 2.2 attendees per square footage of floor space, marketers realize the potential audience they can reach in a single event. With attendees spening 9.1 hours per show in 2012 viewing exhibits, it’s become increasingly important to create memorable and attractive experiences for audiences, to ensure standing out in a potential customer’s memory. Another key metric is Exhibit Attraction. Exhibit Surveys, Inc. calls Exhibit Attraction the percentage of an exhibitor’s Potential Audience who remembered visiting a company’s exhibit. Exhibit Surveys estimates Exhibit Attraction at approximately 81%.

If that’s true, trade shows are becoming more and more successful, but at the same time more and more competitive. “The function of the physical exhibit is to selectively attract its potential audience from among the total audience at the show. Factors which most often determine success in this regard include: awareness for the company and its products among the audience, pre- and at-show promotion, exhibit design and graphics, demos and attention-getting techniques, interest in products or services exhibited, and exhibit size. Over the past several years, exhibitors have been more successful in selectively attracting their potential audience,” says Exhibit Surveys website in presenting key metrics.

Creating a Multisensory Experience
If everyone is using eye-catching displays and graphics to attract their potential audience, companies are going to have to turn to new and innovative techniques for attracting visitors to their displays. This is where stock music comes in handy. Music and audio engages other senses that may be being neglected in the trade show environment, which is a typically sight- and touch-centered environment. By strategically playing stock music and even occasional sound effects, companies can increase their displays’ overall appeal and effectiveness. Here are a few ways you can successfully integrate stock music into your trade show displays:

1) Background music for live presentations and product demos. If your booth involves regular demonstrations by staff members and how-to sessions, you can spice these up with a little background music. Set the tone and grab attention with a “demo theme” track that you play before and after the demo starts. Include high-energy music softly underneath product demonstrations to keep the energy up and the presentation moving forward. Or just sprinkle in some sound effects for comedic effect (though that will take some rehearsing).

2) Soundtracks for promotional videos. Have tons of HD tvs and monitors surrounding your audience with moving images and recorded demonstrations? Add soundtracks to your videos with corporate, pop, and commerical stock production music tracks for a memorable viewing experience and keep your viewers watching those screens.

3) Sound effects as regular calls to action. Signal deals, raffles, or specially scheduled events to show attendees by playing a chime or cool sound effect for just a couple seconds. This can be a cash register sound effect to signal special giveaway at the top of every hour, or a boxing ring bell to signal a live demo or panel discussion.

4) Ambience for the entire booth. You can set the mood by continuously playing energetic or ambient music to create a multisensory experience for your visitors. Just remember to heed your shows’ volume regulations.

No matter how you do it, utilizing royalty free stock music can dramatically increase your memorability factor at a trade show, and draw attention to your display without a huge increase in cost, making the time and money at your next trade show better spent.

5 Tips for Promoting Your Music with Social Media

Social media has become the standard for promoting your music online. According to Alex Pham of the LA Times, “musicians who don’t take advantage of social networking tools will soon perish in the La Brea tar pits of old-school media.”

According to Pham, and a panel of social media rock-star experts, the five following tips can help you maximize your usage of social networks, and take your next album from bronze to platinum.

1. Be real. “It can’t just be about commerce. People want to connect with you and get to know you. They don’t want to connect with you if you’re just telling them to go buy your record. They don’t want you to be perfect, either. They want you to be real.” — Evan Greene, chief marketing officer, the Recording Academy

2. Pick a couple of services you like and focus on them. “There are so many services out there that trying to do everything and be everywhere is impossible. Play around with them. It’s okay to mess up. And don’t have a PR person handle your tweets. It should be all about having a real conversation with your fans.” — Kevin Rose, founder, Digg

3. Have something unique. “There’s so much already out there, and people have so little time that having something unique about yourself and your music can give you a competitive advantage. Figure out what’s unique about you and ask: What is the distilled message? It has to be something so remarkable that other people will have to share it.” — Pete Cashmore, founder, Mashable

4. Share things that you are most excited about. “Share things you find, love, hate and create. Share the things you’ve made, even if it’s not finished yet. That’s what makes it engaging.” — David Karp, founder, Tumblr

5. Embrace anarchy. “We had an event called the summit. A thousand people would participate and become part of the recording process. I got a Twitter message from someone in Iran who was frustrated they couldn’t come. We came up with a program that allowed them to sit at home and participate. It’s a world of chaos at times. But there are lessons. It’s a fertile ground for creativity.” — Jared Leto, vocalist, guitarist and songwriter for the band 30 Seconds to Mars

Do you do these already? What else do you do to stay in touch with your fans and your customers?