Tag Archives: sound effects

Using Stock Music at Trade Shows to Create a Multisensory Experience

Enhance your trade show presence with stock music for a display people will remember.
If you or your marketing team are regular exhibitors at trade shows, you know the value of standing out from the crowd. Stock music, when used correctly, can enhance your company’s marketing efforts at industry shows and events, increasing the ROI of your marketing spend.

stock music for trade shows
Key Stats
With the typical trade show boasting on average 2.2 attendees per square footage of floor space, marketers realize the potential audience they can reach in a single event. With attendees spening 9.1 hours per show in 2012 viewing exhibits, it’s become increasingly important to create memorable and attractive experiences for audiences, to ensure standing out in a potential customer’s memory. Another key metric is Exhibit Attraction. Exhibit Surveys, Inc. calls Exhibit Attraction the percentage of an exhibitor’s Potential Audience who remembered visiting a company’s exhibit. Exhibit Surveys estimates Exhibit Attraction at approximately 81%.

If that’s true, trade shows are becoming more and more successful, but at the same time more and more competitive. “The function of the physical exhibit is to selectively attract its potential audience from among the total audience at the show. Factors which most often determine success in this regard include: awareness for the company and its products among the audience, pre- and at-show promotion, exhibit design and graphics, demos and attention-getting techniques, interest in products or services exhibited, and exhibit size. Over the past several years, exhibitors have been more successful in selectively attracting their potential audience,” says Exhibit Surveys website in presenting key metrics.

Creating a Multisensory Experience
If everyone is using eye-catching displays and graphics to attract their potential audience, companies are going to have to turn to new and innovative techniques for attracting visitors to their displays. This is where stock music comes in handy. Music and audio engages other senses that may be being neglected in the trade show environment, which is a typically sight- and touch-centered environment. By strategically playing stock music and even occasional sound effects, companies can increase their displays’ overall appeal and effectiveness. Here are a few ways you can successfully integrate stock music into your trade show displays:

1) Background music for live presentations and product demos. If your booth involves regular demonstrations by staff members and how-to sessions, you can spice these up with a little background music. Set the tone and grab attention with a “demo theme” track that you play before and after the demo starts. Include high-energy music softly underneath product demonstrations to keep the energy up and the presentation moving forward. Or just sprinkle in some sound effects for comedic effect (though that will take some rehearsing).

2) Soundtracks for promotional videos. Have tons of HD tvs and monitors surrounding your audience with moving images and recorded demonstrations? Add soundtracks to your videos with corporate, pop, and commerical stock production music tracks for a memorable viewing experience and keep your viewers watching those screens.

3) Sound effects as regular calls to action. Signal deals, raffles, or specially scheduled events to show attendees by playing a chime or cool sound effect for just a couple seconds. This can be a cash register sound effect to signal special giveaway at the top of every hour, or a boxing ring bell to signal a live demo or panel discussion.

4) Ambience for the entire booth. You can set the mood by continuously playing energetic or ambient music to create a multisensory experience for your visitors. Just remember to heed your shows’ volume regulations.

No matter how you do it, utilizing royalty free stock music can dramatically increase your memorability factor at a trade show, and draw attention to your display without a huge increase in cost, making the time and money at your next trade show better spent.

Ten Great Scary Sound Effects for Halloween

Halloween is one of our favorite times of year. Not because we love playing dress-up, but because there are so many great ways to use royalty free sound effects to cause a little trouble. Whether you’re creating a horror film, or just scaring the neighborhood children this All Hallows Eve, here are a few of our favorite stock sound effects that you can use in virtually any project:

Scary Sound Effects

1) Demons: Demon or Devil Speaks (348862) – Demon, Satan or Alien Creature speaks backwards with a dark, sinister & scary distorted voice. Perfect Sound Effect/Background for anything that has to do with Horror or Sci-Fi. 2 takes one wet and one dry.

2) Zombie Walking Dead (351598) – Halloween is never complete without the walking dead. This sound effect is ambience of a zombie walking and dragging chains, moaning and growling. Mmmm. Brains.

3) Woman Screaming (351240) – We know it’s cliché, but you have to have a shrill, high-pitched scream from a terrified woman.

4) Intestine Squeeze (359236) – Incredibly gross and unnerving are the sounds of blood and bones, cracking and squeezing. Great effect for stepping on bugs or crushing human flesh…

5) Guillotine (374342) – Off with their heads! This sound effect of a guillotine being used is loud and scary. Great for all sorts of scenes involving a guillotine.

6) Ghostly Whispers In Radio Static (377784) – If you listen closely, you can hear the voices of the dead in whispering in the radio interference. Eerie and haunting.

7) Evil Laugh (243018) – Deep and sinister male dastardly evil laughter. Multiple scary sound effects for the price of one.

8) Horror Show Intro (383950) – It may be a little cheesy, but it’s quite perfect for use as source material for someone watching a horror flick on television, complete with thunder and lightning, pipe organ, and screams. We told you not to watch that movie before bed — it will give you nightmares!

9) Long Door Creak (379218) – Reminds us of Michael Jackson’s Thriller. Quintessencial creaky wooden door gradually opening. Household audio can be so sinister when used the right way.

10) Metallic Cinematic Swell (377177) – Foreboding and mysterious, this stock audio clip is great sound design that has uses beyond Halloween, from transitions to sci-fi.

Using Royalty Free Sound Effects to Create High Quality Location Sound

If you’ve ever filmed a scene on a windy day or outside on a busy street, you know how valuable sound effects are for recreating or even creating ambience and the audio landscape from scratch. If you’re a seasoned sound editing pro, or a beginner looking to get in on the basics, follow these three tips to create a vibrant soundtrack for your film or video using royalty free sound effects.

royalty free sound effects1) Start with variety, avoid looping. It can be tempting to put sound effects on loop. But if you need to create a soundscape of a busy intersection with lots of cars passing by, select several different cars and different “car passing by” sound effects. Why? Think about it: when you’re on the street, does the same care pass you by 30 times in 2 minutes? No, they’re all different. So find as many different drive-by sound effects as you can, and do your best not to loop the same one over and over again. You can vary timing of entrances, stagger multiple, even mess with the eq or tone of individual effects if you only have a couple to work with. This will enhance realism, and give you the most realistic sound.

2) Pick dry sound effects over affected effects. In other words, add your own reverb (echo). No two sound effects are going to have been recorded in the same space, so to make your audience believe their ears, you’ll have to tweak the reverb a bit. In a cave? Add some echo. On a windy mountain top, go as dry as you can. In a tiled room, put just enough reverb on the effect to make it sound like the noises are bouncing off the tiles. When you do this, be sure to take note of your reverb settings, and try to get a consistent sound when you’re creating sounds in the same “room”.

3) Use your ears in real life. Go out to the ocean and listen. Really listen. What do you hear on that shoreline? Is it realistic to put a barge passing by in your soundbed in a beach scene? Not likely. Listening closely to the way rooms and locations sound in real life will help you create better, more realistic sounding atmospheres. It will also get your creative juices flowing. Can you hear construction outside an office window? How about the sound of kids playing in a park — the rub of a slide, or the thud of falling to the ground? Getting a grasp on the individual elements that make up chaos is an important step in the soundtrack creation process.

Scary and Mysterious Stock Music Pick of the Week

With Halloween right around the corner, we put together a spooky little pick of the week featuring a royalty free stock music theme by Premium Trax combined with some haunting stock footage of a mountain sunrise along with a stock photo of a pile of skulls with some fancy vintage effects. We figure all that’s left is a few horror sound effects from the Productiontrax library, and you’ve got yourself a nice piece of media to scare the neighborhood children.

Scary and Mysterious Theme features deep and dark orchestral strings, an almost-cliché bell-like synth sound, big drum hits and scary sound effects. It dark, mysterious character makes it perfect for dramatic suspense movies and videos. We combined this track with stock footage clip 372369, an otherwise harmless video of a mountain sunrise, and immediately felt something sinister brewing. We recommend pairing the track with other clips of fog and shadows to achieve a similar fee.

For the stock photo, we chose a photo that’s disturbing on its own — photo ID 325152: a pile of skulls. We affected it with some aged film effects, and it added that horror picture feel right in. The beauty of this track is in its ability to creepify even the most mundane of images. We recomend taking some shots of a city street at night and affecting it the same way. You’ll see what we mean.