Tag Archives: sound effects

Five More Great Ways To Use Royalty Free Music

royalty free musicThirsty for more ideas on how to incorporate royalty free music into your next project? Here are five more great ideas that will give you the power to create complete filmscores in minutes, enthuse children everywhere, and even maximize your next marketing campaign’s ROI.

1) Create and Entire Indie Film Soundtrack. The royalty free music tracks from Productiontrax.com are so powerful and so complete that they can easily be mixed and matched together to form a complete film score for an indie film production. Go for a cohesive, thematically linked sound with a music package, or just pick out cuts that match each scene — either way, using royalty free music in your independent production is a great way to save some money and keep your film on budget.

2) Add Pizzazz to a Mobile Smartphone App. Whether you’re developing on Android or iOS, royalty free music and sound effects (especially sound effects) can be a huge asset to your final product. Whether it be a track that plays as an underscore to a game, or a simple beep effect to enhance a button click or alert, your next mobile application will appreciate the low bandwidth and storage footprint of quality compressed royalty-free MP3s.

3) Make a Children’s Toy or Game Even More Fun. Creating a multimedia board game or a dancing flower pot? Using royalty free music is a great way to get your product to market faster and without legal hassles of product-placed music tracks. Add sound effects to a plush toy, music to a light-up bouncing ball… the possibilities are endless.

4) Keep Your Boss Awake During Your Next Powerpoint Presentation at Work. Adding a background music track will keep your coworkers’ attention on your presentation at your next big board meeting. Add sound effects for transitions and music beds for inspiration, and your next powerpoint might get you a promotion. Better yet, take your trade show exhibit to the next level with some royalty free music and watch your sales soar.

5) Create Brand Identity in Advertising or Marketing Campaign. A catchy jingle can be the difference in brand recognition, and help you stand out from the competition. Leverage the cost savings of royalty free music in your next marketing campaign or television advertising campaign, and increase your effectiveness and maximize your ROI.

Are your sound effects and stock music tracks legal?

I came across this story the other day talking about how Warner/Chappell Music is being sued for demanding royalty payments for the usage of the song “Happy Birthday,” and it brought to mind some important misconceptions about what it means for a sound effect or stock music track to be in the public domain.

As much as I personally dislike large music publishing conglom-a-corp-a-plunderbunds because I think large companies don’t have artists’ best interests at heart, but the fact remains that the song Happy Birthday is still under copyright. Just because the song is popular and well known doesn’t make the plaintifs case that “the song should be dedicated to public use…” Under that logic, MC Hammer’s “Can’t Touch This” should be public domain because it is both popular and well known. Not true.

With that in mind, the question both video production companies and stock music and sound effects producers alike should ask themselves when considering a piece of stock audio for purhcase or sale is “Is everything in this track legal?” Of course, if it’s 100% originally composed and produced, like most music on Productiontrax, then of course it is legal. Even though the tracks are under copyright, they’re still licensed royalty free. But, if the sound effect or music track has audio in it recorded live, you have to check it for copyrighted sounds before uploading or downloading (uploading content that contains copyrighted sounds to Productiontrax is against the terms of service).

For example…
Is there a snippet of copyrighted music in it? Not legal.
Uses sample software or sampled sounds to produce the track? Legal.
Contains a sound of a tv or radio playing a copyrighted song? Not legal.
Contains a human singing Happy Birthday? Not legal.
Contains a piano playing a Chopin Waltz? Legal.

You get the idea. The key here is to double check your work. We triple check at Productiontrax when we can to make absolutely certain that the media you find here will be 100% licensable and not get you into a legal battle with a plunderbund, but keep these tips in mind when looking for sound effects from your favorite sound effects sharing site, or from some other music library that has some hard to find stock audio clips from 1950s television. Your legal budget will thank you.

Translations: Royalty Free Stock Music in Your Native Language

Productiontrax.com provides royalty free music and sound effects, stock footage, and stock photos to a wide client base spanning the globe, with content created and uploaded by thousands of contributors from virtually every country on the planet. With such an international community dedicated to stock media and video production, we knew it was time to make it possible for everyone to browse our huge production music library in their very own language.

From French to Japanese, Spanish to Arabic, we’ve got the world’s major languages covered, thanks to the nifty translate tool at the bottom of the page. Just scroll to the bottom of the main Productiontrax.com site, select your favorite language from the menu, and watch as the translations happen before your very eyes. Every subsequent page you visit on Productiontrax will be presented in the language you selected, making it easy to understand and find the royalty free music and stock audio files you’re looking for.

Here’s our brief little video tutorial:

Professional Use of Sound Effects in Filmmaking

At one time, films were silent. They did not have a score, audible actors or the audio effects that we have come to expect in modern pictures. Back then, the first movies with sound were called “talkies.” This is similar to how motion picture was first shortened to “movie.” Nowadays, it is standard for a film to feature licensed or original music, a score that heightens the drama and intensity of the onscreen action and a plethora of carefully-selected sound effects.

Choosing the right effect can do an amazing job of intensifying onscreen action. Without the screech of the tires and the reverberating sound of the metal, a high-speed car crash would not have the same impact, even if it was depicted using state of the art effects techniques. Properly chosen and filtered ambient noise can make the audience feel like they are physically in the setting of the film. The recorded and processed sounds of crowds, rainstorms and city noise can set the mood and add a great deal of depth to any scene.

With how crucial audio effects are to the overall cohesion of a film, choosing the wrong effects can prove catastrophic. As an example, consider the American film “The Ring.” This picture was based on a Japanese film entitled “Ringu.” In one scene, a mother tosses her daughter into a well. In the American version, this was accomplished using silence from a tape and ambient noise for the scene in which the tape was being played. “Ringu” opted for a cartoon “Thwap” effect. This is a prime case of where it is crucial to avoid cliche effects and unrealistic content in order to keep the audience engaged.