Top 5 Best Royalty Free Music Guides and Tutorials

No matter what your experience level, constant learning is a must. These five guides and tutorials will you learn about royalty free music and sound effects. Boost your production career – whether you create video games, podcasts, YouTube videos or commercials for television.

1. How to License Royalty Free Music and Sound Effects

This guide will teach you the basics of music licensing in general and then take you deep into what to look for from a royalty free music license. No matter where you get your stock music from, the best music licenses out there will have the same basic coverage to keep you protected. Once you’ve completed this tutorial, you’ll be able to identify the situations where different licensing would be required, and where production music can help.

2. Royalty Free Horror Music and Sound Effects Guide for Halloween

Any great filmmaker knows that the rights soundtrack makes all the difference. This guide will teach you how to use horror music tracks in every possible situation to create fear and suspense. Not for the faint of heart, the tutorial takes an in-depth look at different music styles used in horror films. It also explains why good sound effects are so hard to find, and how you can use them effectively to create a sense of realism for your audience.

3. The difference between Public Domain and Royalty Free Music

It’s a common question, but answers seem to vary everywhere you look. This tutorial cuts through the noise to get to the heart of what exactly public domain is, why it’s important, and how it can benefit your next project. The guide covers the different kinds of copyright out there and what they cover. It then goes into detail about how songs become copyrighted and when they are considered public domain. By the end of the guide, you’ll have uncovered advantages and disadvantages of public domain music, as well as what you can and can’t do with public domain music.

4. How to Find Royalty Free Christmas Music for the Holidays

Most professional videographers know that the holidays are one of the busiest times of year for video production. Therefore, getting the best royalty free music for the Christmas holidays is a must. Beyond YouTube and event videos, Christmas production music can be used for holiday-themed podcasts and tv commercials. This guide goes into how to maximize your music budget with royalty free music, and how to locate the best tracks for your project.

5. 10 Ways to Use Romantic Production Music

This last guide is for all you lovers out there. While there are many tried and true ways to use romantic music, this tutorial provides many additional ideas and suggestions for using romantic royalty free music. From greeting cards to toys and beyond, you’ll be surprised to read all of the innovative ways romantic music can be used in your business.

Loudness in Production Music – What You Need To Know

‘The Loudness War’ is a hot topic in production music circles. For those who aren’t familiar, loudness involves the way that music is compressed and limited at the mixing and mastering stages. This allows the music to sound LOUD!

Apart from being weary of giving the listener ear fatigue, regulatory standards (such as R128) impact the way loudness relates to music production. New measuring metrics, including LUFS, compete with older RMS measurements. All of these factors make loudness a potential minefield for anyone looking to produce professional, high-quality audio.

Find royalty free music for your next project.

production music waveform
The whole premise of ‘loudness’ in music comes down to the way the ear perceives the quiet and not so quiet passages within a piece.

The history of LOUD

The idea of making your music sound loud is nothing new. Making sure that your album out enough volume was essential back when records competed with each other on jukeboxes in bars. The actual mechanics of mastering records required various tricks to make things sound louder and more bassy. Meanwhile, physical limitations of making sure the stylus stayed in the groove meant that loudness could only go so far.

These limitations no longer applied after the introduction of CDs and DAT in the 80s. Mastering engineers realized that boundaries could be pushed to make releases sound louder than ever before.

Mix and master

Essentially, loudness comes down to the way the ear differentiates between loud and quiet passages. (Dynamic range is the difference between loud and soft.) A listener percieves an overall boost in volume by squashing peaks and boosting quieter sections.

Compression and limiting tools in mixing and mastering often achieve this effect. However, dynamics can be lost (essentially the difference in volume peak levels), and an ear-fatiguing, ‘brick-walling’ is the end result.

Loudness and Production Music

It is important for production music to stand out from the crowd. Yet, making it too loud can mean end-users suffer in the long run. Most broadcast platforms, including online services like Youtube, apply their own normalization processes. This makes sure everything sounds similar in terms of volume. So, highly compressed pieces of music end up sounding thinner and less effective than those that maintain dynamic range. This is especially true when extra layers of modifications are used.

Moderation and balance are key when it comes to deciding how loud to make production music tracks. Composers and producers should learn this lesson if in order to stand up against the competition.

How Using Royalty Free Music Can Increase Online Ad Income

Royalty free music providers make creating content affordable and easy. Timely, more engaging content paves the way for increasing your online ad income. Source music for your videos and advertisements to boost your bottom line.

New online services make it possible for everyone to create an online income stream by using advertisements. In the past, you could only generate ad revenue by running a publication or broadcasting network. It was also possible if you were a celebrity who could command fees for sponsoring products and brands.

Today things are very different. Third party online ads can be placed on your website. You can even use popular social platforms such as Youtube. Content you create can be monetized by the addition of ads. These ads usually offer your own user base products and services that are targeted towards your audience.

royalty free music playing on television set
Royalty free music helps get your video online faster to help you boost advertising revenue.

No traffic, no click throughs

There is one obvious snag to this attractive business model. If people don’t visit your content, no one will view and click on your ads. This means that you have to make your content as professional, attractive and unique as possible. Quality content appeals to the widest internet audience and pulls in enough traffic to make your ads work for you.

The internet is a visual medium. You must create content that is engaging and competes on equal terms with everything out there. Thankfully, companies like Productiontrax make producing great content easy.

Royalty free music and visuals

One of the big secrets of the film and TV industries is now out in the open. It doesn’t cost a fortune to use visual and audio created by experienced professionals in order to make your own unique content.

Royalty free music, also called library or production music, allows you to buy professional standard music for a small one-off fee. It can be used indefinitely in your own work without incurring any further costs. You can usually find music to fit any kind of video or content. Once you’ve put your content together, you’re ready to drive traffic and serve up ads.

Many talented individuals in the realm of both the film and music industries now make a good living by creating this type of content, which helps others bring their own projects to realization.

So, by taking advantage of this type of service, you can achieve your own goals of making money from ads that are carried alongside the work online.

by David McCarthy

Royalty Free Music for Hibachi Food Truck Promo

Creating promotional trailers for restaurants and small businesses requires high quality content at affordable rates. Kissi Media produced this great promo for the NYC Hibachi food truck Hibachi Heaven using royalty free music from Productiontrax, allowing them to stay on budget without sacrificing quality.

Hibachi Joe, New York City from Kissi Media on Vimeo.

To capture the energy of grilling and chopping, Kissi Media used the stock music track Metal Drum and Bass 170BPM DM by Mykola Odnorog. Their selection of production music for the video helps to introduce Chef Joe and his food truck to the masses in NYC.

From the video description:

“Operated by Johansen Oliva, a Brazil native and New Yorker by way of Miami, Oliva (also known as “Chef Joe”)? serves hungry New Yorkers and foodies alike from the Financial District to Midtown (east/west) and Harlem, where loyal fans and diners flock to the corner of 99th and Madison Ave. Every Monday, employees at Mount Sinai Hospital are treated to the only hibachi dishes in the city available outside an established restaurant.”

We think Kissi Media’s choice of music and food closeups really makes our mouth water for some of Joe’s Yum Yum sauce.

Artists Still Control the Music Economy

Artists can still make money making music.

Taylor Swift’s album, 1989, which racked up 1.287 million copies sold in it’s first week, is proof of that. But Swift’s story tells us more about the so called “new music economy.”

In the week prior to her album release, Swift and her record label removed all of her recordings from Spotify and other music streaming services, which have been notorious for shafting artists on streaming royalties, paying the average copyright holder somewhere in the range of $0.60 to $0.84 per payout. It is safe to say that, had Swift chosen to keep her music available for streaming, her album sales probably would have been cut in half. Instead, the decried move to step away from the streaming model resulted in a huge payoff for Swift and her label.

la-et-ms-first-week-for-taylor-swifts-1989-128-001Spotify urged Swift to be a part of what they called “the new music economy,” arguing that everyone should have access to Swift’s product. But what Swift, and other artists are beginning to realize is that the freemium model is centered around nothing by hype and Silicon Valley market disruption without a clear path forward for the artists and musicians who create music. Swift’s success shows us that music does not have to be free for artists to succeed, and that artists have a say in their financial success.

Artists and labels should be strongly considering moving away from free streaming, $1 stock music licenses, 29 cent downloads, and performances “for publicity.” Similarly, songwriters and composers should stop working for free and devaluing their work by giving it away for minuscule fractions of a penny. Artists and copyright owners have the power and ability to shape the future of the music business, and don’t have to feel pressured to conform to the tech industry’s sharing economy. Rights holders have just as much right to profit from their intellectual property as tech companies do from their technology patents. Whether an artist is selling albums, production music, or giving a concert, their hard work, training, and investment should factor into the retail price of the product they produce.

The fact that paying artists and musicians their fair share of royalties for streaming and downloads would undermine business models for free streaming and low-cost download providers sounds like a “you” problem for those companies, not the musicians whom they are trying to exploit.

Taylor Swift’s actions and subsequent success should be a wake-up call for musicians and record labels trying to compete in a music business that has been redefined by a bunch of 20 somethings in a warehouse loft in San Francisco. Stand up for what is yours – what you create is valuable, start acting like it.

Productiontrax.com Celebrates 10 Years of Royalty Free Music With Site Relaunch

New York, NY – Productiontrax.com (http://www.productiontrax.com) today announced the formal relaunch of a new website design and user experience in honor of their tenth year in business as a trusted stock music library. Productiontrax.com is a leading provider of royalty free music, sound effects, stock footage, and stock photos for use in creative projects and multimedia.

The new website features a completely overhauled and more modern graphical interface, added functionality, and a streamlined user experience. “We wanted to focus on a simpler, faster user experience,” said Productiontrax founder, CEO and lead developer David Negron. “It was really important to highlight and feature the great selection of production music and stock media that our contributing artists have to offer, so we re-thought how we presented those assets to the user, and sought out ways to create a fun, modern, and fast way to audition and purchase stock music, sound effects, footage and photos.”

The new Productiontrax also features the company’s new logo, which represents their first branding update since their first launch ten years ago. A subtle change in font, color and graphics signals the company’s shift to a more modern and simplified feel. Reflecting that change, the new site streamlined display of pricing, and re-launched lightboxes as Favorites (or as the site says, Save Your Favs) – gone are the little lightbulbs, instead replaced with inviting and functionally clear hearts. The new site also boasts an update to the library’s stock footage offerings, featuring larger thumbnails, and speedier video load times. Even the search engine got a tune up, with new sorting and filtering options, and a performance boost.

No customer experience overhaul is complete without changes to customer service integration. “We refined our live chat support tool, and brought our email support tickets into the 21st century,” Negron said. Customers can chat with an agent without using AIM, and can open support tickets from a dedicated interface, or via email, making it easier than ever to get answers to their questions about licensing and downloading royalty free music. “Our customers are the main reason we’ve been around for a decade, and we wanted each and every one of them to have the world class Productiontrax support experience that we’re known for.”

Productiontrax.com (http://www.productiontrax.com) is owned and maintained by One Light Music Productions, Inc. and is based in New York, NY and Phoenix, AZ. The company has been providing stock music and royalty free sound effects, footage, and photos since its inception in 2004.

Six Incredibly Useful Royalty Free Music Tracks for Creating Film Soundtracks

Every filmmaker knows that their soundtrack can make or break their entire film. For video production professionals in particular, the quality of the music being used can either lead to dissatisfied clients or to life long customers. Finding the right music for the right moment can be a tricky process. Luckily, royalty free music libraries like Productiontrax can make the search for the right track easy, providing music that covers a wide range of genres and emotional quality, even from the same piece of music. Here are six incredibly versatile pieces of royalty free music that will change the way you use stock music.

1. Sweet, Sweet Success. From motivational corporate videos, to tech advertising, to children’s projects, this piece by Don Swanson could become your next go-to music track whenever you need something light and positive. Evoking feelings of hope and joy, the track gently evolves into a series of sparkling and beautiful sounds, interweaved with a full string ensemble.

2. Dub Step of Terror. This track by Robert Neary escalates and intensifies, gradually building and incorporating elements of traditional dub step with sounds of horror, adventure, and modern drama. Perfect for a wide range of uses from horror to superhero trailers to science fiction to commercials.

3. Pirates – Action Adventure. Whether you need something dramatic for a vacuum cleaner commercial, or you’re actually sailing the high seas, Igge Scoce’s royalty free action adventure music track will help to create the soundscape that sounds like it was created by a film score orchestra, all without the budgetary drain. Also great for video games, and cinematic sequences.

4. Adventurous Beautiful Majesty. From Christian Andersson of Craze Music comes this lush stock music track that is perfect for heroic epiphanies, fantasy titles, video games, documentaries, travel, nature, science, and gentle, lush underscoring.

5. Clocks. Serene, reflective, yet with constant motion, this piece by Adi Goldstein captures the essence of passing time, internal reflection, sadness, and can be used for montages, television dramas, opening titles, and much more.

6. Rays of Happiness. Quiet piano and strings works for anything. We don’t know why — it just does. This production music track by Filip Halon is perfect as a romantic love song, or as the backdrop to a peaceful scene. We think it works great for PSAs and other narrated commercial spots where a little human authenticity is called for.