South America Travel Uses Royalty Free Music From Productiontrax

To complete their latest video, our friends over at SouthAmerica.travel have used some Royalty Free Music from Productiontrax.com as their soundtrack. The 3:20 minute video features their popular Top 10 South America Tour, a 10 day tour of Chile, Andes, & Buenos Aires, and uses the stock music track Chilean Folk Song by Annie McGee.

Check out their video:

SouthAmerica.travel has 6 videos (and more on the way) featuring some of their most popular tours. Travel has a very visual appeal, and these quick and informational videos help prospective travelers visualize just what exactly is covered on each tour. South America is a vast and beautiful country, and video can bring boring itineraries to life.

It’s easier to explain to someone who has never been to South America about how amazing it is to visit the Iguassu Falls (on the border of Argentina and Brazil) when you have a video clip to show them, rather than to simply say, “It’s one of the world’s largest waterfalls, and it puts Niagara Falls to shame.” An itinerary and photos are great, but a YouTube video embedded in a tour page is going to sweeten the deal, and put that tour above competitors’ tours in the mind’s eye of the viewer.

SouthAmerica.travel has had thousands of YouTube channel views at http://www.youtube.com/SouthAmDotTravel, and many visitors come to their website after watching a video. Visitors to the website often spend extra time on the website than the average user does, which means that once a person watches a South America travel video, they are way more likely to be interested in booking a tour. So the company is excited about the potential for YouTube to connect with a larger audience of travelers.

Stock Music from Productiontrax for Taekwan-Do School Video

We love it when our clients share their projects with us. In this case, Ethron Productions used a royalty free stock music track from Productiontrax.com to accompany their recent video produced for a local Taekwan-Do school. “I am very happy with the result, the music sets the entire epic tone of the video,” said producer Ethron T Young III. The music featured is by contributor Mattias Puumala, who provides stock music compositions on Productiontrax in a wide variety of styles and genres. Check out the trailer:

Production Music Using Video Game Controllers

Admittedly, one of my favorite music production plug-ins is RealGuitar by MusicLab. I use it daily for creating production music tracks in my project studio. It’s relatively inexpensive (like $200), and sounds great, is easy to use, and I’ve been able to fool a lot of people into believing they’re hearing an actual guitar. MusicLab announced the release of RealGuitar 3, and it looks great. Now, you can take that Guitar Hero axe from your xbox or Playstation video game, and play it into your sequencer like a guitar. The results of such an interface capability rival the expression and realism (well in performance, anyway) found in the old MIDI wind controllers, only this time with better sample quality. I was blown away by what I saw on the video and can’t wait to try this with my own production music in the project studio. Check it out:

Free Sound Effects Exchange Sites – Are They Good For The Sound Designer?

It’s not new — there are tons of free sound effects sites out there that give away sound files. The idea is simple, sound designers can upload their collections to these massive libraries, and then the masses flock to the site to download them. Perfectly legal, and perfectly free.

It seems like a win for the consumers, and the average joe looking for a quick booooiinng, but where is the sound designer in all of this? It’s quite surprising to see several big name sound designers giving away their product for free because it’s “good advertising.” Sites that database and archive sounds and allow free downloads by the masses seem to think that they are doing the world a huge favor, when in fact, they are merely hurting the artists and creative production professionals that they’re building their audio file archives upon (leaving sound effects pirates out of the mix here, no pun intended).

Sound designers invest a lot of money into buying expensive audio recording equipment. They spend years training, and more years perfecting recording and editing techniques. If a user is not willing to shell out a few cents for a sound effect, or even a couple of dollars to use royalty free sound effects in their projects, they should have to record the sounds themselves. They’ll quickly realize the hard work it takes to create a sound.