How Royalty Free Music Can Boost Your Video Marketing ROI

If your creative agency like most businesses, you know that getting the most bang for your buck from your marketing dollars is crucial to success. If you use needledrop or custom production music in any of your marketing, making the switch to royalty free music in your marketing activities, whether on social media or at live events, can save you thousands of dollars per project, making switching to stock music an effective strategy for increasing your bottom line.
royalty free music for video marketing
If you market using video on social media sites, creating videos for YouTube or other video agregators is key to your success. However, professional production can cost tens of thousands of dollars, from actors to equipment, to full out production companies, editors, script writers, and more. Adding to this expense is custom music, which can run you anywhere from several hundred to several thousands for a couple minutes of music, especially if you’re looking for exclusivity. In fact, many production houses build in music licensing fees anywhere from $5000 to $20,000 depending on the project’s overall budget. All this for an online video?

You can trim the fat, thereby increasing your video’s overall effectiveness and increasing your ROI by switching to inexpensive royalty free music. Sure, it’s not exclusive, and sure, you’re not going to have Miley Cyrus’s latest twerk. However, finding something similar sounding by a professional musician in a royalty free music library will save you tens of thousands in licensing fees. If you can avoid needledrop libraries, where they charge you a fee per use, you can even make your project even more cost-effective. At productiontrax.com, you can get a professionally produced pop soundtrack for your next YouTube video for less than $50, with no needledrop fees, and no royalties to pay.

By cutting out unnecessary licensing costs, you can remove bloat from your project’s overall cost. If you could lower your marketing spend by $5000, and still get comparable results, it seems like a no-brainuh. Let’s face it, it’s the internet. No one is going to care (or even remember) that you got the exclusive rights to Twerkatwerk, 2013’s top pop smash, for your viral video. Royalty free music is a perfect substitute: it’s plenty cheaper, and sounds just as good.

My Friend – Nostalgic Folk Pop Royalty Free Production Music

This week, we’re featuring the Production Music track My Friend, ID 378834, a nostalgic folk pop cut that is great for peaceful, reflective moments in any type of multimedia project (such as the stock footage clips we paired it up with). This piece of royalty free music isn’t your typical stock music track: it’s packed with emotion and pensive thought, with gentle acoustic guitar strumming and interspersed piano melodies moving the piece forward while reflecting on all that is and was.

For demonstration purposes, we’ve combined this track with some amazing nature stock footage: clips 350535 (a large tree branch dripping from rain) and 350306 (a stately tree with autumn-colored leaves gently flowing in a fall breeze). The clips are peaceful and reflective, and show off the emotional nature of this week’s royalty free music pick.

Using Royalty Free Sound Effects to Create High Quality Location Sound

If you’ve ever filmed a scene on a windy day or outside on a busy street, you know how valuable sound effects are for recreating or even creating ambience and the audio landscape from scratch. If you’re a seasoned sound editing pro, or a beginner looking to get in on the basics, follow these three tips to create a vibrant soundtrack for your film or video using royalty free sound effects.

royalty free sound effects1) Start with variety, avoid looping. It can be tempting to put sound effects on loop. But if you need to create a soundscape of a busy intersection with lots of cars passing by, select several different cars and different “car passing by” sound effects. Why? Think about it: when you’re on the street, does the same care pass you by 30 times in 2 minutes? No, they’re all different. So find as many different drive-by sound effects as you can, and do your best not to loop the same one over and over again. You can vary timing of entrances, stagger multiple, even mess with the eq or tone of individual effects if you only have a couple to work with. This will enhance realism, and give you the most realistic sound.

2) Pick dry sound effects over affected effects. In other words, add your own reverb (echo). No two sound effects are going to have been recorded in the same space, so to make your audience believe their ears, you’ll have to tweak the reverb a bit. In a cave? Add some echo. On a windy mountain top, go as dry as you can. In a tiled room, put just enough reverb on the effect to make it sound like the noises are bouncing off the tiles. When you do this, be sure to take note of your reverb settings, and try to get a consistent sound when you’re creating sounds in the same “room”.

3) Use your ears in real life. Go out to the ocean and listen. Really listen. What do you hear on that shoreline? Is it realistic to put a barge passing by in your soundbed in a beach scene? Not likely. Listening closely to the way rooms and locations sound in real life will help you create better, more realistic sounding atmospheres. It will also get your creative juices flowing. Can you hear construction outside an office window? How about the sound of kids playing in a park — the rub of a slide, or the thud of falling to the ground? Getting a grasp on the individual elements that make up chaos is an important step in the soundtrack creation process.