How Using Royalty Free Music Can Increase Online Ad Income

Royalty free music providers make creating content affordable and easy. Timely, more engaging content paves the way for increasing your online ad income. Source music for your videos and advertisements to boost your bottom line.

New online services make it possible for everyone to create an online income stream by using advertisements. In the past, you could only generate ad revenue by running a publication or broadcasting network. It was also possible if you were a celebrity who could command fees for sponsoring products and brands.

Today things are very different. Third party online ads can be placed on your website. You can even use popular social platforms such as Youtube. Content you create can be monetized by the addition of ads. These ads usually offer your own user base products and services that are targeted towards your audience.

royalty free music playing on television set
Royalty free music helps get your video online faster to help you boost advertising revenue.

No traffic, no click throughs

There is one obvious snag to this attractive business model. If people don’t visit your content, no one will view and click on your ads. This means that you have to make your content as professional, attractive and unique as possible. Quality content appeals to the widest internet audience and pulls in enough traffic to make your ads work for you.

The internet is a visual medium. You must create content that is engaging and competes on equal terms with everything out there. Thankfully, companies like Productiontrax make producing great content easy.

Royalty free music and visuals

One of the big secrets of the film and TV industries is now out in the open. It doesn’t cost a fortune to use visual and audio created by experienced professionals in order to make your own unique content.

Royalty free music, also called library or production music, allows you to buy professional standard music for a small one-off fee. It can be used indefinitely in your own work without incurring any further costs. You can usually find music to fit any kind of video or content. Once you’ve put your content together, you’re ready to drive traffic and serve up ads.

Many talented individuals in the realm of both the film and music industries now make a good living by creating this type of content, which helps others bring their own projects to realization.

So, by taking advantage of this type of service, you can achieve your own goals of making money from ads that are carried alongside the work online.

by David McCarthy

Mystery Groove – Stock Music loop for Detective Shows

This week, we dive in to the genre of detective mysteries. Our royalty free music pick of the week is a short little stock music track by Matthew Anklan called Mystery Groove (track ID 387379). Without sounding dated, this production music track features four trumpets and rhythm section, complete with note bends, harmon mutes, and a delightfully funky beat and bass line.

The looped groove is perfect for comedy, mystery, and investigative shows, and immediately gave us images of the Pink Panther, Inspector Gadget, Mr. Monk, Sean Spencer, and other famously wacky television detectives. We combined this track with a stock footage clip ID 74853, which is a shot of a forrest road winding through some pretty dense fog. The video, also available for download at Productiontrax, adds to the mysterious yet almost comical flare of this music track. We think this piece will work equally well as a soundtrack for children’s projects or advertising.

License the audio: http://www.productiontrax.com/royalty-free-music/387379
Get the footage: http://www.productiontrax.com/stock-footage/74853

Production Music and Content ID: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

With production music venturing more and more into the online space, content ID and musical fingerprinting programs are becoming evermore necessary, evermore prevalent and evermore obtrusive. Fingerprinting and content recognition is vital for combating piracy, but at the same time creates headaches in a crowded and quickly-changing creative field of royalty free music production.

audio fingerprinting
The Good
Content Identification is great for maintaining order in an industry that sees more piracy every day. With the increasing availability of high-end but low-cost audio software, more and more people are expressing their creativity with music more than ever. While accessibility drives innovation in the arts, technological progress oftentimes comes at the expense of time-honored copyright laws. For content owners and the artists who create, content ID programs offer a way to monitor and be properly compensated for your work. Content Identification systems can recognize your music in a video, on a website, or in an app, thereby giving you the opportunity to exercise your right as first exploitation. No matter your distribution and compensation strategy, all artists benefit from knowing who is using their music, and where their music is playing.

The Bad
On Youtube especially, Content ID is soulless. The systems in place do not recognize people, and cannot infer circumstances, nor does the system attempt to try. Some may argue that this is by design — an attempt to leave authoritative control in the hands of the copyright owner. However, without fully grasping common licensing practices, especially in the stock media and production music industries, these content scans are an all-powerful guilty-until-proven-innocent judge and jury. Customers of stock music sites often find themselves harrassed by the YouTube Content ID system for using music that they have properly licensed, oftentimes with threats of closing down the user’s channel. So much for doing things the right way, and ignoring pleas from the licensor, no matter how much authority was granted to them by the original copyright holder, requiring full licenses from the original owner in order to fully satisfy its documentation needs.

Additionally, content identification systems don’t have real ears. While fingerprinting and sonic imaging have come a long way in recent years, true content matching can only be done by a human being — especially when it comes to production music. Think about it: every composer out there is using the same sample libraries as the next guy. OF COURSE THEY ALL MATCH SOMETHING ELSE, it’s because the instruments are identical. Only a human can make the distinction between a fair use of a lick or sample kit, a common harmonic progression, or a loop pack.

youtube content idThe Ugly
The YouTube Content ID system contractually requires the content owners who provide the data to be exclusive rights holders. Yes, exclusive. Read the terms. All of those Ad Rev and Ad Share companies out there? Yeah, they’re all claiming that they own your (the composer) work. Worse, they’re collecting ad revenue on your behalf and chances are, unless you’ve signed a contract with these companies, you’re not seeing a dime. We know of a bunch of music libraries who made deals to provide huge databases of music tracks to these companies without telling you, and without paying you. What winds up happening because of this, in addition to someone else making money off of your hard work who is not you, is that tracks are getting improperly attributed. Confusion abounds as to who really owns what — and usually, to satisfy the DMCA, service providers are forced by the law to turn a blind eye. Some protection.

How Productiontrax Uses Content ID
Productiontrax.com does not submit song data to Content ID programs. We do, however, scan our library against the content identification databases to identify songs, and we match this data to the data provided by our users. Why? We do this for two reasons:

1) To make sure that our clients are properly licensed when they purchase music on Productiontrax.com. Scanning, fingerprinting, and identifying songs uploaded help us to keep the promises we make in the end user license, representing and warranting that we have properly and adequately obtained rights to license all of the work posted to our site. This protects our customers, protects us, and helps protect you.

2) To protect composers. Through content identification, we can spot fraud, illegal uses, and stolen music — not from us, but from you. We can also spot errors in the content identification database, where your music is being attributed to another musician, composer, or fraudster, when in fact, it belongs to you.

Ultimately, Content ID, when used and maintained properly is an excellent tool, and should be used by copyright owners. But for your sake, do it without the middleman.

Great Expectations – Wintery Royalty Free Production Music

Winter might be on the thaw, but you can instill that icy chill into any multimedia project with this week’s royalty free production music pick of the week, Great Expectations. With choirs, bells, and orchestral strings, this track has a layer of intrigue and motivation that combines with sounds traditionally heard during the cold winter months to create a character all of its own.

It sort of reminds us of a Harry Potter sequence — a dark sinister stroll through enchanted woods, or in the deep recesses of a medieval castle. A suitable theme for an evil villain, sorcerer, or fantasy role playing game, this piece has moments of huge muiscal epic-ness and quiet contemplation (or brooding). But don’t let that pidgeon hole you to the fantasy genre. Ad campaigns for companies ranging from security systems to banks and insurance companies could find creative use for these tracks. We feel a sports car commercial would probably make great use of this production music track.

For our pick of the week video, we paired this short piece with stock footage of nighttime snow and fog filmed from a moving car in an eerily empty parking lot. Notice how the creepy feel transfers over to the second stock footage clip, establishing a winter scene haunted farm, demonstrating the music’s versatility.

Get the stock music: http://www.productiontrax.com/royalty-free-music/341353
Get the driving stock footage: http://www.productiontrax.com/stock-footage/304231
Get the winter farm footage: http://www.productiontrax.com/stock-footage/304737